ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Career One Stop Occupation Profile

Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive

Description: what do they do?

Perform routine clerical and administrative functions such as drafting correspondence, scheduling appointments, organizing and maintaining paper and electronic files, or providing information to callers.

Also known as:

Staff Assistant, Administrative Specialist, Administrative Technician, Department Secretary, Administrative Assistant, Secretary, Administrative Secretary, Clerk Typist, Office Assistant, Administrative Associate

Career video

https://cdn.careeronestop.org/OccVids/OccupationVideos/43-6014.00.mp4

Transcript: Transcript for this video is not available

Outlook: will there be jobs?

New job opportunities are very likely in the future.

Find job openings

Projected employment

California United States
222,300
2014 Employment
2,457,000
2014 Employment
245,100
2024 Employment
2,521,100
2024 Employment
10%
Percent change
3%
Percent change
4,630
Annual projected job openings
32,310
Annual projected job openings

Compare projected employment

Typical wages
Annual wages for Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks in California

Location California United States
10% $24,720 $21,470
25% $31,330 $27,320
Median $39,470 $34,820
75% $49,810 $43,920
90% $60,430 $53,060

Education and experience: to get started

People starting in this career usually have:

  • High school diploma or equivalent
  • No work experience
  • Less than 1 month on-the-job training

Programs that can prepare you:

  • Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, General
  • Executive Assistant/Executive Secretary

Typical education

How much education do most people in this career have?

Certifications: show your skills

Let employers know you have the skills to do well at this job.
Earning a certification can help you:

  • Get a job
  • Get a promotion

Find certifications
Licenses: do you need one?

Some states require an occupational license to work in this career.
Find license details for your state

Apprenticeships: learn on the job

Apprenticeships combine paid on-the-job-training with classroom lessons.
Find apprenticeship sponsors

Activities: what you might do in a day

  • Operate computers or computerized equipment.
  • Execute sales or other financial transactions.
  • Answer telephones to direct calls or provide information.
  • Collect deposits, payments or fees.
  • Enter information into databases or software programs.
  • Record personnel information.
  • Select resources needed to accomplish tasks.
  • Report maintenance or equipment problems to appropriate personnel.
  • Operate office equipment.
  • Discuss account status or activity with customers or patrons.
  • Greet customers, patrons, or visitors.
  • Refer customers to appropriate personnel.
  • Prepare documentation for contracts, transactions, or regulatory compliance.
  • Schedule appointments.
  • Operate communications equipment or systems.
  • Coordinate operational activities.
  • Distribute materials to employees or customers.
  • Record information from meetings or other formal proceedings.
  • Issue documentation or identification to customers or employees.
  • Make travel, accommodations, or entertainment arrangements for others.
  • Schedule operational activities.
  • Distribute incoming mail.
  • Route mail to correct destinations.
  • Order materials, supplies, or equipment.
  • Proofread documents, records, or other files to ensure accuracy.
  • Search files, databases or reference materials to obtain needed information.
  • Prepare employee work schedules.
  • Develop organizational policies or programs.
  • Develop computer or online applications.
  • Send information, materials or documentation.
  • Manage clerical or administrative activities.
  • Maintain current knowledge related to work activities.
  • Supervise clerical or administrative personnel.
  • Train personnel.
  • Prepare informational or reference materials.

Knowledge

People in this career often know a lot about:

  • Clerical – Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as
    word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription,
    designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • English Language – Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language
    including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Computers and Electronics – Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips,
    electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications
    and programming.

Skills

People in this career often have these skills:

  • Writing – Writing things for co-workers or customers.
  • Reading Comprehension – Reading work-related information.
  • Active Listening – Listening to others, not interrupting, and asking good questions.
  • Speaking – Talking to others.
  • Time Management – Managing your time and the time of other people.
  • Service Orientation – Looking for ways to help people.

Abilities

People in this career often have talent in:

  • Oral Comprehension – Listening and understanding what people say.
  • Near Vision – Seeing details up close.
  • Written Comprehension – Reading and understanding what is written.
  • Oral Expression – Communicating by speaking.
  • Written Expression – Communicating by writing.
  • Speech Clarity – Speaking clearly.
  • Speech Recognition – Recognizing spoken words.
  • Information Ordering – Ordering or arranging things.
  • Problem Sensitivity – Noticing when problems happen.

Related occupations

  • Office Clerks, General
  • Receptionists and Information Clerks
  • Library Assistants, Clerical
  • Executive Secretaries and Executive Administrative Assistants
  • Insurance Policy Processing Clerks
  • Bill and Account Collectors
  • License Clerks
  • Interviewers, Except Eligibility and Loan
  • Medical Records and Health Information Technicians
  • Hotel, Motel, and Resort Desk Clerks

This information was retrieved on 2/10/2018 at 8:24 PM Eastern Time from Occupation Profile at CareerOneStop (www.CareerOneStop.org), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. https://www.CareerOneStop.org/Toolkit /Careers/Occupations/occupation-profile.aspx
Wage information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Program. (https://www.bls.gov/oes/home.htm)
Education information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections. (https://www.bls.gov/emp/)
Information on Occupational Description, Interests and Tasks comes from the Occupation
Information Network. (https://www.onetonline.org/)

REQUEST A CALL


By submitting this information, you agree that we may call, email and/or text you about educational services via the contact information you provided.

Office Clerk

Career OneStop Occupation Profile

Office Clerks, General

Description: what do they do?

Perform duties too varied and diverse to be classified in any specific office clerical occupation, requiring knowledge of office systems and procedures. Clerical duties may be assigned in accordance with the office procedures of individual establishments and may include a combination of answering telephones, bookkeeping, typing or word processing, stenography, office machine operation, and filing.

Also known as:

Office Assistant, Administrative Assistant, Office Coordinator, Customer Service Representative, Administration Assistant, Secretary, Office Clerk, Clerk, Receptionist, Office Manager

Career video

https://cdn.careeronestop.org/OccVids/OccupationVideos/43-9061.00.mp4

Transcript: Transcript for this video is not available

Outlook: will there be jobs?

New job opportunities are very likely in the future.

Find job openings

Projected employment

California United States
331,200
2014 Employment
3,062,500
2014 Employment
363,500
2024 Employment
3,158,200
2024 Employment
10%
Percent change
3%
Percent change
10,370
Annual projected job openings
75,620
Annual projected job openings

Compare projected employment

Typical wages
Annual wages for Office Clerks, General in California

Location California United States
10% $21,220 $19,300
25% $24,550 $23,300
Median $32,810 $30,580
75% $42,410 $39,530
90% $52,920 $50,410

Education and experience: to get started

People starting in this career usually have:

  • High school diploma or equivalent
  • No work experience
  • Less than 1 month on-the-job training

Programs that can prepare you:

  • General Office Occupations and Clerical Services

Typical education

How much education do most people in this career have?

Certifications: show your skills

Let employers know you have the skills to do well at this job.
Earning a certification can help you:

  • Get a job
  • Get a promotion

Find certifications
Licenses: do you need one?

Some states require an occupational license to work in this career.
Find license details for your state

Apprenticeships: learn on the job

Apprenticeships combine paid on-the-job-training with classroom lessons.
Find apprenticeship sponsors

Activities: what you might do in a day

  • Operate office equipment.
  • Answer telephones to direct calls or provide information.
  • Maintain inventory records.
  • Prepare cash for deposit or disbursement.
  • Collect deposits, payments or fees.
  • Execute sales or other financial transactions.
  • Send information, materials or documentation.
  • Respond to customer problems or complaints.
  • Confer with coworkers to coordinate work activities.
  • Distribute incoming mail.
  • Sort mail.
  • Compile data or documentation.
  • File documents or records.
  • Prepare documentation for contracts, transactions, or regulatory compliance.
  • Proofread documents, records, or other files to ensure accuracy.
  • Check data for recording errors.
  • Supervise clerical or administrative personnel.
  • Schedule appointments.
  • Prepare employee work schedules.
  • Search files, databases or reference materials to obtain needed information.
  • Make travel, accommodations, or entertainment arrangements for others.
  • Provide information to coworkers.
  • Monitor inventories of products or materials.
  • Train personnel.
  • Record information from meetings or other formal proceedings.
  • Transcribe spoken or written information.
  • Maintain office equipment in proper operating condition.

Knowledge

People in this career often know a lot about:

  • Clerical – Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Customer and Personal Service – Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language – Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Skills

People in this career often have these skills:

  • Active Listening – Listening to others, not interrupting, and asking good questions.
  • Reading Comprehension – Reading work-related information.
  • Speaking – Talking to others.

Abilities

People in this career often have talent in:

  • Oral Expression – Communicating by speaking.
  • Oral Comprehension – Listening and understanding what people say.
  • Speech Clarity – Speaking clearly.
  • Written Comprehension – Reading and understanding what is written.
  • Written Expression – Communicating by writing.
  • Speech Recognition – Recognizing spoken words.
  • Near Vision – Seeing details up close.

Related occupations

  • Receptionists and Information Clerks
  • License Clerks
  • Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive
  • Medical Records and Health Information Technicians
  • Payroll and Timekeeping Clerks
  •  Word Processors and Typists
  • Insurance Claims Clerks
  • Medical Secretaries
  • Switchboard Operators, Including Answering Service
  • Bill and Account Collectors

This information was retrieved on 2/10/2018 at 8:24 PM Eastern Time from Occupation Profile at CareerOneStop (www.CareerOneStop.org), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. https://www.CareerOneStop.org/Toolkit
/Careers/Occupations/occupation-profile.aspx
Wage information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Program. (https://www.bls.gov/oes/home.htm)
Education information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections. (https://www.bls.gov/emp/)
Information on Occupational Description, Interests and Tasks comes from the Occupation Information Network. (https://www.onetonline.org/)





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By submitting this information, you agree that we may call, email and/or text you about educational services via the contact information you provided.

Sterile Processing

Career OneStop Occupation Profile

Medical Equipment Preparers

Description: what do they do?

Prepare, sterilize, install, or clean laboratory or healthcare equipment. May perform routine laboratory tasks and operate or inspect equipment.

Also known as:

Instrument Technician, Central Sterile Supply Technician (CSS Technician), Central Processing Technician (CPT), Sterile Preparation Technician, Certified Registered Central Service Technician (CRCST), Central Service Technician (CST), Sterilization Technician, Sterile Technician, Sterile Processing Technician, Sterile Processing and Distribution Technician (SPD Technician)

Career video

https://cdn.careeronestop.org/OccVids/OccupationVideos/31-9093.00.mp4

Transcript: Transcript for this video is not available

Outlook: will there be jobs?

New job opportunities are very likely in the future.

Find job openings

Projected employment

California United States
6,500
2014 Employment
52,000
2014 Employment
7,600
2024 Employment
59,300
2024 Employment
17%
Percent change
14%
Percent change
250
Annual projected job openings
1,810
Annual projected job openings

Compare projected employment

Typical wages
Annual wages for Medical Equipment Prepares in California

Location California United States
10% $27,510 $23,610
25% $33,310 $28,060
Median $43,080 $34,400
75% $55,630 $41,860
90% $64,590 $50,620

Education and experience: to get started

People starting in this career usually have:

  • High school diploma or equivalent
  • No work experience
  • 1 to 12 months on-the-job training

Programs that can prepare you:

  • Sterile Processing Technology/Technician

Typical education

How much education do most people in this career have?

Certifications: show your skills

Let employers know you have the skills to do well at this job.
Earning a certification can help you:

  • Get a job
  • Get a promotion

Find certifications
Licenses: do you need one?

Some states require an occupational license to work in this career.
Find license details for your state

Apprenticeships: learn on the job

Apprenticeships combine paid on-the-job-training with classroom lessons.
Find apprenticeship sponsors

Activities: what you might do in a day

  • Clean medical equipment.
  • Maintain medical equipment or instruments.
  • Operate medical equipment.
  • Prepare medical instruments or equipment for use.
  • Record vital statistics or other health information.
  • Monitor medical equipment to ensure proper functioning.
  • Inventory medical supplies or equipment.
  • Stock medical or patient care supplies.
  • Attend educational events to update medical knowledge.

Knowledge

People in this career often know a lot about:

  • Customer and Personal Service – Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language – Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Biology – Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.

Skills

People in this career often have these skills:

  • Critical Thinking – Thinking about the pros and cons of different ways to solve a problem.
  • Monitoring – Keeping track of how well people and/or groups are doing in order to make improvements.
  • Quality Control Analysis – Testing how well a product or service works.

Abilities

People in this career often have talent in:

  • Near Vision – Seeing details up close.
  • Problem Sensitivity – Noticing when problems happen.
  • Oral Comprehension – Listening and understanding what people say

Related occupations

  • Endoscopy Technicians
  • Semiconductor Processors
  • Crushing, Grinding, and Polishing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders
  • Dental Laboratory Technicians
  • Histotechnologists and Histologic Technicians
  • First-Line Supervisors of Housekeeping and Janitorial Workers
  • Surgical Technologists
  • Separating, Filtering, Clarifying, Precipitating, and Still Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders.
  • Pump Operators, Except Wellhead Pumpers
  • Non-Destructive Testing Specialists

This information was retrieved on 2/10/2018 at 7:43 PM Eastern Time from Occupation Profile at CareerOneStop (www.CareerOneStop.org), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. https://www.CareerOneStop.org/Toolkit
/Careers/Occupations/occupation-profile.aspx
Wage information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Program. (https://www.bls.gov/oes/home.htm)
Education information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections. (https://www.bls.gov/emp/)
Information on Occupational Description, Interests and Tasks comes from the Occupation Information Network. (https://www.onetonline.org/)





REQUEST A CALL


By submitting this information, you agree that we may call, email and/or text you about educational services via the contact information you provided.

Veterinary Assisting

Career OneStop Occupation Profile

Veterinary Assistants and Laboratory Animal Caretakers

Description: what do they do?

Feed, water, and examine pets and other nonfarm animals for signs of illness, disease, or injury in laboratories and animal hospitals and clinics. Clean and disinfect cages and work areas, and sterilize laboratory and surgical equipment. May provide routine post-operative care, administer medication orally or topically, or prepare samples for laboratory examination under the supervision of veterinary or laboratory animal technologists or technicians, veterinarians, or scientists.

Also known as:

Technician Assistant, Avian Keeper, Veterinarian Assistant, Veterinary Technician Assistant (Vet Tech Assistant), Emergency Veterinary Assistant, Small Animal Caretaker, Animal Caregiver, Veterinary Assistant (Vet Assistant), Research Animal Attendant, Animal Care Provider

Career video

https://cdn.careeronestop.org/OccVids/OccupationVideos/31-9096.00.mp4

Transcript: Whether an orangutan needs surgery or a rat performs in a drug trial, veterinary assistants and laboratory animal caretakers help make sure animals’ needs and well-being are looked after. Veterinary assistants and laboratory animal caretakers perform routine care tasks such as bathing and exercising animals, cleaning and disinfecting facilities, and providing first aid or care after surgery. They work under the supervision of scientists, veterinarians, and veterinary technologists and technicians. They also administer medication, and help restrain animals for examinations and lab procedures. While empathy for animals makes for a good start, there’s often a somber side to animal care. These caregivers treat animals who are sick or have been mistreated and sometimes need to be euthanized. Handling and restraining animals takes physical strength and stamina, but dexterity is also important— especially when handling medical equipment. Good communication skills and an eye for detail are also essential. Work settings for these two fields differ: Veterinary assistants typically work in clinics and animal hospitals, helping treat animals with injuries and illnesses, while laboratory animal caretakers generally work in laboratories where they feed and monitor the animals involved in research. Work hours may be full- or part-time, and often include nights, weekends and holidays. Most workers in these fields have a high school diploma or equivalent, and learn the work on the job.

Outlook: will there be jobs?

New job opportunities are very likely in the future.

Find job openings

Projected employment

California United States
10,600
2014 Employment
73,400
2014 Employment
12,600
2024 Employment
80,000
2024 Employment
19%
Percent change
9%
Percent change
420
Annual projected job openings
2,190
Annual projected job openings

Compare projected employment

Typical wages
Annual wages for Veterinary Assistants and Laboratory Animal Caretakers in California

Location California United States
10% $21,590 $18,540
25% $24,420 $21,170
Median $28,260 $25,250
75% $33,100 $30,460
90% $40,850 $37,810

Education and experience: to get started

People starting in this career usually have:

  • High school diploma or equivalent
  • No work experience
  • Less than 1 month on-the-job training

Programs that can prepare you:

  • Sterile Processing Technology/Technician

Typical education

How much education do most people in this career have?

Certifications: show your skills

Let employers know you have the skills to do well at this job.
Earning a certification can help you:

  • Get a job
  • Get a promotion

Find certifications
Licenses: do you need one?

Some states require an occupational license to work in this career.
Find license details for your state

Apprenticeships: learn on the job

Apprenticeships combine paid on-the-job-training with classroom lessons.
Find apprenticeship sponsors

Activities: what you might do in a day

  • Hold patients to ensure proper positioning or safety.
  • Clean patient rooms or patient treatment rooms.
  • Control prescription refills or authorizations.
  • Monitor patient progress or responses to treatments.
  • Give medications or immunizations.
  • Assist practitioners to perform medical procedures.
  • Monitor patients to detect health problems.
  • Maintain medical equipment or instruments.
  • Clean medical equipment.
  • Assess physical conditions of patients to aid in diagnosis or treatment.
  • Teach medical procedures or medical equipment use to patients.
  • Collect biological specimens from patients.
  • Prepare medical instruments or equipment for use.
  • Feed patients.
  • Administer basic health care or medical treatments.
  • Conduct diagnostic tests to determine patient health.
  • Assist patients with daily activities.
  • Prepare patient treatment areas for use.
  • Stock medical or patient care supplies.
  • Dispose of biomedical waste in accordance with standards.
  • Record vital statistics or other health information.
  • Perform clerical work in medical settings.
  • Schedule patient procedures or appointments.
  • Process medical billing information.
  • Inventory medical supplies or equipment.
  • Prepare medical reports or documents.

Knowledge

People in this career often know a lot about:

  • Customer and Personal Service – Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Biology – Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
  • English Language – Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Abilities

People in this career often have talent in:

  • Problem Sensitivity – Noticing when problems happen

Related occupations

  • Physical Therapist Aides
  • Occupational Therapy Aides
  • Pharmacy Aides
  • Dental Assistants
  • Home Health Aides
  • Dietetic Technicians
  • Veterinary Technologists and Technicians
  • Radiologic Technologists
  • Personal Care Aides
  • Pharmacy Technicians

This information was retrieved on 2/10/2018 at 7:44 PM Eastern Time from Occupation Profile at CareerOneStop (www.CareerOneStop.org), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. https://www.CareerOneStop.org/Toolkit
/Careers/Occupations/occupation-profile.aspx
Wage information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Program. (https://www.bls.gov/oes/home.htm)
Education information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections. (https://www.bls.gov/emp/)
Information on Occupational Description, Interests and Tasks comes from the Occupation Information Network. (https://www.onetonline.org/)





REQUEST A CALL


By submitting this information, you agree that we may call, email and/or text you about educational services via the contact information you provided.

Administative Medical Clerk

Career One Stop Occupation Profile

Medical Secretaries

Description: what do they do?

Perform secretarial duties using specific knowledge of medical terminology and hospital, clinic, or laboratory procedures. Duties may include scheduling appointments, billing patients, and compiling and recording medical charts, reports, and correspondence.

Also known as:

Patient Coordinator, Health Unit Coordinator, Physician Office Specialist, Medical Office Specialist, Admissions Coordinator, Unit Secretary, Medical Secretary, Billing Coordinator, Ward Clerk, Unit Support Representative

Career video

https://cdn.careeronestop.org/OccVids/OccupationVideos/43-6013.00.mp4

Transcript: Transcript for this video is not available

Outlook: will there be jobs?

New job opportunities are very likely in the future.

Find job openings

Projected employment

California United States
73,200
2014 Employment
527,600
2014 Employment
88,300
2024 Employment
635,800
2024 Employment
21%
Percent change
21%
Percent change
2,280
Annual projected job openings
16,380
Annual projected job openings

Compare projected employment

Typical wages
Annual wages for Medical Secretaries in California

Location California United States
10% $25,700 $23,220
25% $30,820 $27,710
Median $38,230 $33,730
75% $47,980 $40,400
90% $58,060 $49,730

Education and experience: to get started

People starting in this career usually have:

  • High school diploma or equivalent
  • No work experience
  • 1 to 12 months on-the-job training

Programs that can prepare you:

  • Medical Administrative/Executive Assistant and Medical Secretary
  • Medical Insurance Specialist/Medical Biller
  • Medical Office Assistant/Specialist

Typical education

How much education do most people in this career have?

Certifications: show your skills

Let employers know you have the skills to do well at this job.
Earning a certification can help you:

  • Get a job
  • Get a promotion

Find certifications
Licenses: do you need one?

Some states require an occupational license to work in this career.
Find license details for your state

Apprenticeships: learn on the job

Apprenticeships combine paid on-the-job-training with classroom lessons.
Find apprenticeship sponsors

Activities: what you might do in a day

  • Answer telephones to direct calls or provide information.
  • Schedule appointments.
  • Operate office equipment.
  • Operate computers or computerized equipment.
  • Interview employees, customers, or others to collect information.
  • Maintain medical records.
  • Maintain financial or account records.
  • Send information, materials or documentation.
  • Refer customers to appropriate personnel.
  • Collect deposits, payments or fees.
  • Greet customers, patrons, or visitors.
  • Compile data or documentation.
  • Relay information between personnel.
  • Prepare documentation for contracts, transactions, or regulatory compliance.
  • Transcribe spoken or written information.
  • Prepare business correspondence.
  • Order materials, supplies, or equipment.

Knowledge

People in this career often know a lot about:

  • Customer and Personal Service – Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language – Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Clerical – Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Computers and Electronics – Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Administration and Management – Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

Skills

People in this career often have these skills:

  • Speaking – Talking to others.
  • Active Listening – Listening to others, not interrupting, and asking good questions.
  • Service Orientation – Looking for ways to help people.

Abilities

People in this career often have talent in:

  • Oral Comprehension – Listening and understanding what people say.
  • Oral Expression – Communicating by speaking.
  • Speech Recognition – Recognizing spoken words.
  • Speech Clarity – Speaking clearly.
  • Written Comprehension – Reading and understanding what is written.

Related occupations

  • Receptionists and Information Clerks
  • Medical Records and Health Information Technicians
  • Interviewers, Except Eligibility and Loan
  • Switchboard Operators, Including Answering Service
  • License Clerks
  • Office Clerks, General
  • Bill and Account Collectors
  • Hotel, Motel, and Resort Desk Clerks
  • Insurance Claims Clerks
  • Word Processors and Typists

This information was retrieved on 2/10/2018 at 8:25 PM Eastern Time from Occupation Profile at CareerOneStop (www.CareerOneStop.org), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. https://www.CareerOneStop.org/Toolkit
/Careers/Occupations/occupation-profile.aspx
Wage information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Program. (https://www.bls.gov/oes/home.htm)
Education information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections. (https://www.bls.gov/emp/)
Information on Occupational Description, Interests and Tasks comes from the Occupation Information Network. (https://www.onetonline.org/)





REQUEST A CALL


By submitting this information, you agree that we may call, email and/or text you about educational services via the contact information you provided.

Administrative Accounting Clerk

Career OneStop Occupation Profile

Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks

Description: what do they do?

Compute, classify, and record numerical data to keep financial records complete. Perform any combination of routine calculating, posting, and verifying duties to obtain primary financial data for use  in maintaining accounting records. May also check the accuracy of figures, calculations, and postings pertaining to business transactions recorded by other workers.

Also known as:

Accounts Receivable Clerk, Bookkeeper, Account Receivable Clerk, Accounts Payable Specialist,  Accounting Assistant, Accounts Payables Clerk, Account Clerk, Accounts Payable Clerk, Accounting Clerk, Accounting Associate

Career video

https://cdn.careeronestop.org/OccVids/OccupationVideos/43-3031.00.mp4
Transcript: Transcript for this video is not available

Outlook: will there be jobs?

New job opportunities are very likely in the future.

Find job openings

Projected employment

California United States
192,000
2014 Employment
1,760,300
2014 Employment
188,600
2024 Employment
1,611,500
2024 Employment
-2%
Percent change
-8%
Percent change
1,880
Annual projected job openings
17,260
Annual projected job openings

Compare projected employment

Typical wages
Annual wages for Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks in California

Location California United States
10% $26,350 $23,880
25% $34,390 $30,640
Median $44,050 $38,390
75% $55,370 $48,440
90% $66,010 $59,630

Education and experience: to get started

People starting in this career usually have:

  • Some college, no degree
  • No work experience
  • 1 to 12 months on-the-job training

Programs that can prepare you:

  • Accounting Technology/Technician and Bookkeeping

Typical education

How much education do most people in this career have?

Certifications: show your skills

Let employers know you have the skills to do well at this job.
Earning a certification can help you:

  • Get a job
  • Get a promotion

Find certifications
Licenses: do you need one?

Some states require an occupational license to work in this career.
Find license details for your state

Apprenticeships: learn on the job

Apprenticeships combine paid on-the-job-training with classroom lessons.
Find apprenticeship sponsors

Activities: what you might do in a day

  • Maintain financial or account records.
  • Operate computers or computerized equipment.
  • Execute sales or other financial transactions.
  • Verify accuracy of financial or transactional data.
  • Prepare cash for deposit or disbursement.
  • Compile data or documentation.
  • Calculate financial data.
  • Operate office equipment.
  • Collect deposits, payments or fees.
  • Monitor financial information.
  • Reconcile records of sales or other financial transactions.
  • Code data or other information.
  • File documents or records.
  • Answer telephones to direct calls or provide information.
  • Search files, databases or reference materials to obtain needed information.
  • Prepare documentation for contracts, transactions, or regulatory compliance.
  • Calculate costs of goods or services.
  • Maintain inventory records.

Knowledge

People in this career often know a lot about:

  • Customer and Personal Service – Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Clerical – Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Mathematics – Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and
    their applications.

Skills

People in this career often have these skills:

  • Mathematics – Using math to solve problems.

Abilities

People in this career often have talent in:

  • Oral Comprehension – Listening and understanding what people say.
  • Mathematical Reasoning – Choosing the right type of math to solve a problem.
  • Written Comprehension – Reading and understanding what is written.
  • Near Vision – Seeing details up close.
  • Written Expression – Communicating by writing.
  • Number Facility – Adding, subtracting, multiplying, or dividing.
  • Problem Sensitivity – Noticing when problems happen.
  • Oral Expression – Communicating by speaking.

Related occupations

  • Brokerage Clerks
  • Billing, Cost, and Rate Clerks
  • Payroll and Timekeeping Clerks
  • Legal Secretaries
  • Tax Preparers
  • Executive Secretaries and Executive Administrative Assistants
  • File Clerks
  • Human Resources Assistants, Except Payroll and Timekeeping
  • Procurement Clerks
  • Municipal Clerks

This information was retrieved on 2/12/2018 at 2:07 PM Eastern Time from Occupation Profile at CareerOneStop (www.CareerOneStop.org), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. https://www.CareerOneStop.org/Toolkit /Careers/Occupations/occupation-profile.aspx Wage information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Program. (https://www.bls.gov/oes/home.htm) Education information comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections. (https://www.bls.gov/emp/) Information on Occupational Description, Interests and Tasks comes from the Occupation Information Network. (https://www.onetonline.org/)





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Accounting Clerk Careers

If you enjoy working with numbers, turn your skill into a career! Any company that offers a service, sells a product, or generally makes money has to keep track of everything coming in and every penny that goes out to pay for materials and even employee pay. What this means is that every company needs to have someone well-versed in accounting processes to help them keep track of all those expenses. If you enjoy working with facts and figures, that someone could be you! If you’re considering a career as an accounting clerk in Modesto, California, learn more about what that usually entails here:

JOB DESCRIPTION

Generally, accounting clerk jobs are office-based and don’t generally call for travel. Standard duties include working with accounts payable and receivable, managing all ledger accounts, and coordinating payments or preparing invoices with customers and vendors. This position calls for someone who can balance multiple accounts, track codes appropriately, and keep detailed records. Accounting clerks are also responsible for keeping up with accounting principles and regulations at the federal and state level.

SALARY & BENEFITS

Based on the national numbers from PayScale.com, the median pay for an accounting clerk is $15.42 an hour, which equates to roughly $37,000 a year. Average annual pay across the country ranges anywhere from $28,000 to $50,000, depending on experience, career training, and company. Of course, pay will vary by location, and Modesto companies generally pay higher than average for a trained accounting clerk. Benefits will vary on a per-company basis, but an accounting clerk can generally expect all or most of the standard benefits package to apply:

  • medical, dental, and vision insurance coverage or employer assistance for the cost
  • life insurance coverage or matching
  • retirement savings, possibly with employer matching

GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES

According to PayScale.com, the majority of accounting clerks have between 1 and 9 years of experience. From there, an accounting clerk can move into positions like staff accountant, accountant, accounting manager, and accounts payable clerk. With experience and training, an accounting clerk can ultimately go into careers like senior accountant, financial controller, or certified public accountant (CPA). Ultimately, this means there is plenty of room for growth and several career paths that can lead to higher pay and better benefits—as long as you get the training and experience.

TYPICAL HOURS

On average, an accounting clerk position is usually kept to the standard 40-hour work week. However, many accounting clerks earning an hourly wage report earning anywhere from $17 to $31 an hour in overtime pay. Salaried accounting clerks may not get the option of paid overtime, but there is a possibility for bonuses and profit sharing at some companies. As a whole, accounting clerk positions will usually uphold the usual 8 hour work days, Monday through Friday, but this may vary by company.

QUALIFICATIONS

The skills most companies look for when hiring an entry-level accounting clerk include: Microsoft Office abilities as well as general ledger accounting, account management, banking, and data processing. Applicants should be able to manage accounts payable and accounts receivable as well as maintain records digitally as well as physical copies.  If this sounds like something that interests you as a future career, get the training you need to be successful. Contact Stellar Career College today  and get the information you need to get started . Contact our academic advisers





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Administrative Assistant Careers

Today’s typical administrative assistant position has evolved since the “Mad Men” days. These days, it is no longer enough to be able to answer the phone and take messages. The modern administrative assistant can often be expected to do a wide range of different tasks that can include everything from responding to emails to making international travel plans and so much more. On top of all the clerical duties, many administrative assistants serve as the “gatekeeper” for the office, as they are the first person a visitor will see on entering. Because of the increased level of expectations, it’s becoming more and more difficult to secure a job in this growing field without some sort of training or education. At Stellar Career College in Modesto, California, we offer 10, 18, and 36 week administration courses to teach you the skills employers are looking for.

JOB DESCRIPTION

Standard administrative assistant tasks include:

  • Secretarial duties like data entry, record-keeping, office correspondence (including phone, email, fax, and in-person), and inventory/ordering
  • Customer service tasks such as providing directions and answering questions that range from simple to complex
  • Accounting tasks from billing to payroll and more

However, please note that this is a very broad overview. Generally speaking, most administrative assistants will be expected to have strong interpersonal skills and a sturdy base knowledge of computer systems. Beyond that, office administration tasks will vary depending on the industry, so you will want to look into specific skills needed if you want to work in a certain area.

SALARY & BENEFITS

According to Glassdoor.com, the national average salary for an administrative assistant starts around $33,000 a year—but even better, the average salary here in Modesto is even higher, at about $40,000 a year. You can use the link above to filter by location and get a more specific idea of administrative assistant salaries in your area.

Benefits will vary by company, but you can generally expect the standard benefits package to apply:

  • Medical, dental, and vision insurance coverage or employer assistance for the cost
  • Life insurance coverage or matching
  • Retirement savings, possibly with employer matching

GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES

A wide variety of different industries need administrative assistance, so there is plenty of room for growth, as long as you have the necessary skills. From a starting administrative assistant position, you can feasibly transition into careers like office manager, executive assistant, office administrator, or executive assistant to the CEO. With additional training, it is also possible to transition to Human Resources positions.

TYPICAL HOURS

The hours will vary fairly widely based on the company, which is great because of the flexibility this provides for your schedule. A salaried position working in office administration for a law firm can generally expect the typical 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., with potential for overtime on occasion. Or, for a business open 24-hours a day, an administrative assistant may be needed to work evenings or overnight shifts.

QUALIFICATIONS

The general qualifications needed for an administrative position include communications skills and a solid foundation in computer use and standard software. Digital data entry, record keeping, and correspondence are some of the standard skills needed, so a successful administrative assistant will need to know how to use the Microsoft suite of products, including Office, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. In addition, successful candidates will be able to display customer service skills and a basic office administration knowledge.

To learn the skills you need to start your career as an administrative assistant, Stellar Career College can help! In terms of administrative assistant training, we offer a Administrative Assistant I course and Administrative Assistant II training. Contact our advisers today to learn more about the courses and sign up for administration courses so you can get into this growing career field!





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MEDICAL CLERK CAREERS

Between everyday illnesses to childbirth and long-term care needs, the medical field isn’t likely to disappear any time soon. Until humanity finds a way to cure all maladies, people will still need medical care, which means hospitals and clinics will need support to run smoothly. Get started in a medical-field career without going to medical school; start your training as a medical clerk in Modesto, California!

JOB DESCRIPTION

A medical clerk is responsible for a lot of the administrative and billing tasks that help keep a medical office running. This often includes working with medical coding, as well we insurance companies, Medicare, and Medicaid to collect payments. It can also include working with patients to answer questions about billing, collecting payments, and keeping accounts up-to-date and accurate.

SALARY & BENEFITS

According to PayScale.com, the median salary across the nation for medical clerks is $13.91 an hour or $33,235 a year. Depending on experience and training, the national salary range can be anywhere from $22,000 a year to $45,000 a year. However, pay will vary from company to company and by location.

As with pay, the benefits for a medical clerk position will vary by company, but the average medical clerk position generally offers some to most of the standard benefits package. Roughly half of medical clerks receive:

  • medical, dental, and vision insurance coverage or employer assistance for the cost
  • life insurance coverage assistance
  • retirement savings, possibly with employer matching

GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES

As with so many medical-related positions, there are plenty of opportunities for growth when starting as a medical clerk. Medical clerk can transition into positions like office manager for a medical office, medical billing manager, and medical billing supervisor. From there, the door is opened to positions like medical office manager, practice manager, and medical billing operations director. The route you take will depend on your experience, training, and interest, but there are plenty of opportunities to make this a lasting and lucrative career field.

TYPICAL HOURS

The work week and hours required to be a medical clerk will vary widely by position. A clinic or medical office may keep standard work-week hours with a slight variation, like one night a week where the office stays later. In a busy hospital, on the other hand, a medical clerk position may work nights or weekends. However, if the position is hourly, there may be opportunities for overtime pay and more schedule flexibility.

QUALIFICATIONS

In order to be a qualified applicant for medical clerk positions, the standard qualifications include:

  • Strong customer service skills
  • Digital and hard-copy data entry
  • Medical billing and coding, including Medicare, Medicaid, and Insurance coding
  • Billing and accounts receivable skills
  • HIPAA regulations

Get the training you need to get started in this growing career field today! Stellar Career College offers both 18 and 36 week career development training to teach you the skills, like medical coding, necessary to find success as a medical clerk. Contact our academic advisers in Modesto today to learn how to get started!





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